Tea Time Is Always Nicer With Crocheted Potholders

I enjoy savoring a cup of organic herbal tea and a sweet treat with my family — perhaps some fruit, a bowl of yogurt or a freshly baked treat. What I don’t love: burning my fingers on a hot teapot or teacup. Between all the cooking and baking we do and our newly instituted afternoon tea time tradition, the potholders I crochet get bunches of use around our place.

Tea time is always nicer with crocheted potholders. A potholder will help you avoid burning your fingers on a hot teapot or tea cup during afternoon tea. Not only that, the potholder can add a pretty touch to your tea table setting. Want to crochet your own potholders for tea time or any time? Read on for fantastic crochet potholder pattern suggestions.
Tea time is always nicer with crocheted potholders. A potholder will help you avoid burning your fingers on a hot teapot or tea cup during afternoon tea. Not only that, the potholder can add a pretty touch to your tea table setting. Want to crochet your own potholders for tea time or any time? Read on for fantastic crochet potholder pattern suggestions.

We recently moved several times, and we couldn’t take everything (truthfully, we couldn’t take much of anything) with us. Our old potholders were left behind when we made the transition — so I’ve been crocheting new ones. I’m super proud of how they’re turning out. If you’d enjoy crocheting some of your own lovely new potholders for tea time, dinnertime or any time, I think you’ll be excited to get your hands on the patterns I’ve been using. Want to take a peek at a couple of my new favorites?

The Sunny Daisy Crochet Potholder

Sunny Daisy  Crochet Potholder: This potholder is made using two octagon motif patterns from Crochet Kaleidoscope by Sandra Eng, published by Interweave. The potholder is finished with a simple shell stitch edging and a hanging loop. Crocheted and photographed by Amy Solovay.
Sunny Daisy Crochet Potholder: This potholder is made using two octagon motif patterns from Crochet Kaleidoscope by Sandra Eng, published by Interweave. The potholder is finished with a simple shell stitch edging and a hanging loop. Crocheted and photographed by Amy Solovay.

To create the golden daisy-themed crochet potholder you see pictured here, I used two different octagon motifs from Sandra Eng’s amazing new book called Crochet Kaleidoscope, published by Interweave:


Motif #98 — motif #98 is an 8-pointed star motif with a crochet flower in the center. If you choose a golden-yellow yarn for the center of the flower and a white yarn for the flower petals, the way I did here, the flower resembles a daisy. Of course, you could customize your potholders by choosing any yarn colors that match your tea set, your dinnerware, your bakeware, your kitchen or your dining room d├ęcor. I used Cascade 220 wool yarns to crochet this potholder.


As far as crochet flower patterns go, this daisy is a really easy one; it isn’t complicated at all. There are lots of other ways you could use it besides just making potholders. You could incorporate the same design into a crochet daisy blanket, a doily or lots of other sorts of projects.

Motif #97 From Crochet Kaleidoscope Is an Octagon Shape Featuring a Sun Shape or Star Shape. This motif was designed by Sandra Eng. Crocheted and photographed by Amy Solovay.
Motif #97 From Crochet Kaleidoscope Is an Octagon Crochet Shape Featuring a Sun Shape or Star Shape. This motif was designed by Sandra Eng. Crocheted and photographed by Amy Solovay.

Motif #97 — motif #97 is an octagon shape with another polygonal shape in the center. This polygon could be interpreted as a sun or a star. I’m choosing to think of it as a sun for this particular design.


After crocheting these two motifs, I whip stitched them together to create a double-thick potholder that’s extra protective (no more burnt fingers!). Then I added a simple shell stitch edging around the outside, placing 2 shells comprised of 5 double crochet stitches on each of the potholder’s 8 sides (these are alternated with slip stitches). In the same round, I also added a hanging loop comprised of 15 chain stitches.


The finishing touch is a round of surface crochet slip stitches worked in white yarn in the spot where the white ground of the potholder touches the golden yellow edging. It’s interesting to me that this looks quite a bit like a round potholder or crochet mandala after adding the edging — although you can tell it’s an octagon shape if you look carefully (especially at the back).


If you do all your stitching carefully, the potholder turns out totally reversible — with a daisy or other flower on the front and a sun or star on the back.


I’m working on trying bunches of other variations on this design using other colors and perhaps (we’ll see) other edgings and other details. I’ll be excited to share information about how they turn out.

Vintage Potholder From Crochet Loom Blooms by Haafner Linssen

Crochet Loom Blooms is one of my new favorite craft books. The patterns in the book are simply beautiful! One of the patterns is called “Vintage Potholder”. I crocheted a modification of this design, and I couldn’t be more thrilled with how it turned out. Take a look!


Vintage Potholder from the Book Crochet Loom Blooms by Haafner Linssen, published by Interweave / Quarto Publishing Group. This Colorway of the Potholder Was Crocheted and Photographed by Amy Solovay. Yarn: Cascade 220 (Note That It Is Much Thicker Than the Yarn Suggested in the Pattern, Resulting in a LARGER Potholder That Is More Like a Hot Pad!)
Vintage Potholder from the Book Crochet Loom Blooms by Haafner Linssen, published by Interweave / Quarto Publishing Group. This Colorway of the Potholder Was Crocheted and Photographed by Amy Solovay. Yarn: Cascade 220 (Note That It Is Much Thicker Than the Yarn Suggested in the Pattern, Resulting in a LARGER Potholder That Is More Like a Hot Pad!)

Isn’t it gorgeous? I LOVE IT!


The Crochet Loom Blooms book is simply amazing. It’s filled with patterns and instructions for making lovely flowers using a flower loom and then finishing them with crochet work. The technique works well for making potholders, blankets, throws, shawls, wraps, doilies and bunches of other projects. This flower loom technique is a fun and interesting way to mix things up a little and keep your crochet from getting repetitive or boring. If you want to learn a new craft without introducing a huge learning curve, this is definitely the way to go; I found the flower loom technique to be intuitive and easy to understand — especially since the author of the book, Haafner Linssen, has provided such clear and helpful instructions for the technique.

Find More Knit and Crochet Potholder Patterns

Don’t worry if fancy floral potholders aren’t your thing; there are zillions of other crochet potholder patterns available in a dazzling variety of different design styles. If you want basic potholders, textured potholders, striped potholders, snowflake potholders, Christmas potholders or just about any other type of potholders imaginable, you’ll find excellent pattern suggestions on our page of knit and crochet potholder patterns. Many, but not all, of the patterns we’ve suggested on that page are free patterns.

Find More Flower Loom Crochet Resources

If the flower loom crochet technique interests you, we invite you to check out our page on the topic. You’ll find information about some of the flower looms and pattern books that are currently available.

Find More Crochet Flower Patterns

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