Tunisian Crochet Meets Bullion Stitch: The Coiled Treble Stitch Vintage Crochet Instructions for a Challenging, Advanced Level Crochet Stitch

What do you get when you take crochet bullion stitch and introduce it to Tunisian crochet? I found one possible answer to this intriguing question by looking in a vintage craft manual for girls called The Girl’s Own Indoor Book.” This book includes instructions for many different craft techniques and different craft projects. The book includes instructions for crochet and other needlework techniques.

Here we have a swatch I worked of the coiled treble stitch, which is one of the crochet stitches described and pictured in this book.

This photo shows a vintage crochet stitch called Coiled Treble Stitch. It is a variation of the crochet bullion stitch where the bullion stitches are worked in rows of Tunisian crochet.

This photo shows a vintage crochet stitch called Coiled Treble Stitch. It is a variation of the crochet bullion stitch where the bullion stitches are worked in rows of Tunisian crochet.

You can compare my swatch against the original vintage illustration of coiled treble stitch:

Vintage Coiled Treble Stitch

Vintage Coiled Treble Stitch

The following instructions are quoted directly from The Girl’s Own Indoor Book:

With the smooth tricote bands are often effectively combined strips in a raised stitch, which I will call the coiled treble.

Make a foundation line of crochet tricote, then 3 chain to turn, * wind the wool 5 times over the hook, pierce it through the perpendicular stitch of the line beneath, draw the wool through all at once except the first chain, which leave on the needle, repeat from *, and at the end of the row return by pulling the wool through one loop at a time.

For small things any ordinary woolen hook will do, but for wide strips, where the stitches almost cover the needle, it is safer to use one tipped with a ball; some of the newest ones are made in gutta-percha, and are sold at 3d. each. The various sizes required may be ascertained with the be 1 gauge, also used for knitting needles; sixpenny ones answer the purpose very well.

Tips and Hints for How to Crochet the Coiled Treble Stitch:

It’s a good thing someone beat me to discovering and naming this stitch. The long-ago author of this book called it “Coiled Treble Stitch”; myself, I probably would have named it “Headache Stitch.”


I discovered that a big part of the problem is the hook I used to crochet my swatch of the stitch. The tip of my Tunisian crochet hook is excessively blunt. The best crochet hooks for working bullion stitch are sharp and pointy. So if you happen to have a Tunisian crochet hook with a sharp, pointy hook, you’ll have an easier time of working this stitch than you would otherwise.


However, you should be aware that this is not an easy stitch by any means; it is definitely one I would recommend to advanced crocheters who are looking for a challenge.


Coiled Treble Stitch

Coiled Treble Stitch — Here you can see how the stitches in my swatch all lean to one side.


I was unable to figure out whether there is a fix for the problem of the stitches leaning and the fabric biasing. There are straight, even stitches shown in the original illustration that accompanies these instructions. So I have deduced that the stitches in my sample, which is biased and leans, have some small issue that needs fixing. I imagine the bias may be something that can be blocked out of the fabric.


I don’t care much for the left-hand selvedge of the fabric.


This picture shows you a side view of a vintage crochet stitch called the "Coiled Treble Stitch." The stitch can be described as a variation of crochet bullion stitch where the bullions are worked in Tunisian crochet style rows.

I worked it according to the original instructions in the book. However, if I were going to make anything using this stitch, I would modify it to add a neater finish to the selvedge. I haven’t tested this idea to see how it would work, but I’d first try working the last stitch of the row in ordinary afghan stitch (Tunisian simple stitch) and perhaps adding some chains to it if needed to make the height work out right. That way, an edging could easily be added around the piece if desired.

More Crochet Stitches:

13 thoughts on “Tunisian Crochet Meets Bullion Stitch: The Coiled Treble Stitch Vintage Crochet Instructions for a Challenging, Advanced Level Crochet Stitch

    • September 20, 2016 at 9:24 pm
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      Hmm. Maybe I’ll try crocheting another swatch and see if I can wrap the yarn in the other direction. Not sure about that, it’s been awhile since I worked the original swatch and I can’t remember all the details of what I did, but it’s worth a try.

      Reply
  • September 20, 2016 at 6:58 pm
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    Amy, I forgot to mention that when using this coiled stitch, I wouldn’t use a soft flexible yarn, I would use a size 10 crochet thread for more definition of the stitch as well as changing the direction of the wrap. I would surmise that this stitch was used for its stability as well as for adding weight. Perhaps on edges or as an insert near edges.

    Reply
    • September 20, 2016 at 9:21 pm
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      Those are great insights, Marie. Thread would likely be a better choice than yarn. Thanks for the comment.

      Reply
  • September 20, 2016 at 7:02 pm
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    The first thought that came to my mind was that this would make a good mat out of twine. You know the twine that is used for macrame. I have seen thin cording that would be good. Also, even rug yarn would work and I think it would make a good mat or table mat or whatever. I am going to try it and see.

    Reply
    • September 20, 2016 at 9:25 pm
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      Those are interesting suggestions, Carol. I like those ideas a lot. Thanks for the comment!

      Reply
  • September 21, 2016 at 8:14 am
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    Carol – my thoughts exactly!

    Reply
  • September 21, 2016 at 8:16 am
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    Another item that comes to mind when I see the swatch is a produce/shopping bag.

    Reply
    • September 25, 2016 at 9:10 am
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      Debbie, I love your idea about using it for a shopping bag. I’d be likely to incorporate other stitches into the design as well. Thanks so much for the comment.

      I knew you all would come up with ideas for this stitch! THANK YOU everyone!

      Reply
  • September 21, 2016 at 1:43 pm
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    That book you have is a treasure. I just looked it up. The first thing that came to mind was a bath mat. I also thought of a cover for a bath chair to prevent sliding.

    Reply
    • September 25, 2016 at 9:08 am
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      Thanks Deb! I agree, it really is a treasure. My copy is falling apart, but otherwise I LOVE it!

      Those are great ideas! Thanks for commenting.

      Reply
  • September 22, 2016 at 3:15 pm
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    This stitch would make a durable kitchen washcloth. With a loop on one corner, the bias wouldn’t matter and it would take a lot of pressure while still being porous enough to dry between uses. Cotton heavy weight yarn. I also like the openness of the stitch for a kitchen rug because I like the crumbs to fall through so I can sweep them up. The rug lasts longer between washings. THANKS!

    Reply
    • September 25, 2016 at 9:07 am
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      Those are fantastic ideas, Kathleen. Thanks for the comment!

      Reply

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