7 Crochet Daisy Patterns A Free Crochet Daisy Pattern, Plus Some Daisy Patterns You Can Buy (That Are Worth the Money)

Daisies provide some of the loveliest inspiration for crochet — and the best part is that it’s really easy to crochet a daisy motif.


Crochet Daisy Patterns: The daisy motif on the front of this potholder is from the book Crochet Kaleidoscope by Sandra Eng.
Crochet Daisy Patterns: The daisy motif on the front of this potholder is from the book Crochet Kaleidoscope by Sandra Eng.

There are many different possible ways to crochet a daisy. One of the most common methods is to start by crocheting a circle using yellow yarn or crochet thread for the center of the daisy; and then to change colors and work individual petals using white yarn or crochet thread. Simple crochet daisies made in this manner can be used as flower appliques to embellish hats, headbands and many other types of projects. Some crochet pattern designers use these flower motifs as the centers of daisy granny squares or hexagons, which are then easy to use for creating crochet daisy blankets and afghans. Some crochet daisy patterns include instructions for working green leaves, and others omit the leaves.

It’s also possible to crochet daisy designs back and forth, in rows, using charted designs.


If you’re interested in finding the best crochet daisy patterns available, the following list will introduce you to all our favorites:

1. Easy Crochet Daisy — Free Pattern

Free Crochet Daisy Flower Pattern
Free Crochet Daisy Flower Pattern

This simple daisy is one of the easiest possible crochet flower patterns. If you’re new to crocheting flowers, this is a fantastic pattern to start off with.

2. Sunny Daisy Potholder

A cheerful, sunny daisy adorns the front of this crocheted potholder. Daisy design is by Sandra Eng, from a book called Crochet Kaleidoscope, published by Interweave. The potholder was crocheted, put together and photographed by Amy Solovay.
A cheerful, sunny daisy adorns the front of this crocheted potholder. Daisy design is by Sandra Eng, from a book called Crochet Kaleidoscope, published by Interweave. The potholder was crocheted, put together and photographed by Amy Solovay.

To make this daisy-themed potholder exactly as shown, you’ll need to crochet two different hexagon motifs from Sandra Eng’s book called Crochet Kaleidoscope, published by Interweave. Then you’ll need to do a bit of additional finishing; whipstitch the two hexagons together; add a shell stitch edging with each shell comprised of 5 double crochet stitches, alternated with crochet slip stitches. There will be 2 shells on each of the octagon’s 8 sides. Then add a round of surface crochet slip stitches where the edging touches the body of the potholder.

See Also: Teatime Is Always Better With Crochet Potholders

3. Daisies Won’t Tell

Daisies Won't Tell: A Crochet Flower Motif Pattern by Jean Leinhauser. The original pattern was modified, crocheted and then photographed by Amy Solovay, resulting in the picture you see here.
Daisies Won’t Tell: A Crochet Flower Motif Pattern by Jean Leinhauser. The original pattern was modified, crocheted and then photographed by Amy Solovay, resulting in the picture you see here.

To make this daisy exactly as shown in my photo on this page, you’ll need to modify a pattern from Jean Leinhauser’s book called 50 Fabulous Crochet Thread Motifs, published by Leisure Arts. The two pattern modifications I made:

  • I worked the pattern using Cascade 220 wool yarn instead of the crochet thread that’s suggested in the pattern.
  • I changed colors after the second round, whereas the original colorway is solid rather than yellow and white.

4. Popcorn Daisy

This is a solid-colored daisy motif with 6 flower petals. Textured popcorn crochet stitches add emphasis to the center of this flower. This is a second daisy design from the book 50 Fabulous Crochet Thread Motifs that I mentioned above.


There’s also a third daisy design included in that book, but I’m not including it on this list because I don’t think it actually looks all that much like a daisy. But overall, the book is a worthwhile buy if you enjoy crocheting daisies and a variety of other motifs using crochet thread (although I used yarn rather than crochet thread to work all the samples I’ve made from this book, and all of them turned out lovely).

5. Delightful Daisies

This daisy design by Haafner Linssen is a bit different than all the other daisy motif patterns featured on this page. How is it different, you might ask? The daisy design itself isn’t crocheted; it’s a flower loom design. However, you finish the daisy by working simple crochet stitches all the way around the loomed flower motif.


You can take a bunch of these daisies and join them to make blankets, shawls, scarves, table linens, or whatever other sorts of projects you might like. This pattern is included in a book called Crochet Loom Blooms, published by Interweave / the Quarto Publishing Group.

6. Hawkesbury River Daisy

Hawkesbury River Daisy Crochet Pattern From the Book Crochet Flowers Step-By-Step
Hawkesbury River Daisy Crochet Pattern From the Book Crochet Flowers Step-By-Step

The Hawkesbury River Daisy is a simple yet lovely crochet daisy pattern. The petals are comprised of loopy crochet work that’s super quick and easy to do. This pattern can be found in a beginner-friendly crochet guide called Crochet Flowers Step-By-Step by Tanya Shliazhko, published by St. Martin’s Griffin.


One of this book’s unique selling points: It includes every type of crochet instructions you could possibly wish for — symbol crochet charts, illustrated step-by-step tutorials featuring full-color photographs, and thorough text instructions. If you enjoy crocheting flowers, this book has patterns for many other different types of flower motifs including roses, pansies and bunches of others.

7. Folk Daisy

Emma Lamb has designed a simple and lovely daisy she calls the “Folk Daisy,” which is included in a beginner’s crochet pattern book called Mollie Makes Crochet. If you’re new to crochet and you need a step-by-step beginner’s course, complete with a broad variety of beginner-friendly patterns that include some flowers and bunches of other types of patterns, this is a fantastic crochet book to add to your library.

These 7 designs are my go-to crochet daisy patterns when I need to crochet a daisy for various purposes. I’m sure there are many other fantastic daisy patterns out there, and I’ll be on the lookout for them. Please feel free to suggest your favorite daisy crochet patterns and I will consider adding them to this list.

Related Resources

This page was last updated on 4/10/2018.

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