Crochet Hooks

Crochet hooks are useful tools to have on hand. Crocheters and knitters both need them for various tasks, and it’s helpful to have a range of different sizes to work with.

Crochet Hook Brands

My advice to crochet beginners: Before you get too comfortable with one particular brand of crochet hook, try out several. I make this recommendation because, if you wait too long to experiment, you may develop a strong preference for the brand you began crocheting with — even if that brand would not necessarily be the best for your individual crochet work. If there’s a “best hook” out there for you and your way of crocheting, it’s good to discover that early on, before you get too comfortable with a brand that wouldn’t work as well for you.

Boye Crochet Hooks

A Boye Crochet Hook Set Including 8 Aluminum Crochet Hooks

A Boye Crochet Hook Set Including 8 Aluminum Crochet Hooks


The Boye brand name has been around since 1906. It began with the founding of the Boye Needle Company, although they didn’t begin manufacturing crochet hooks until 1917.

I have, and often use, Boye hooks that date back to the early 1980s — plus some from the 90s and early 2000s as well.

You can usually find inexpensive aluminum Boye hooks for sale at your local “big box” craft store for a few dollars each, and they’re also sold in sets.

These hooks are fine to work with; they’re sturdy, affordable, and they get the job done. I have bunches of these in my craft supply stash, and I use them often.

The big downsides to Boye’s standard aluminum hooks: Some of them have raised text on the thumb rest, which can rub on your skin while you are crocheting, creating irritation. Their handles are not ergonomic. Also, if you’re crocheting in a cold room, or outside in the cold, the hook gets cold. That’s because of the aluminum material, and the same thing would happen with any aluminum crochet hook; it isn’t unique to the Boye brand. If you want to avoid frozen-finger syndrome, a bamboo, wooden or plastic hook would be a better choice.

Nowadays, Boye makes a variety of crochet hooks including double-ended crochet hooks, Tunisian crochet hooks, and Jumbo plastic (size P) crochet hooks, in addition to their usual lines of steel and aluminim crochet hooks.

Susan Bates Crochet Hooks

Susan Bates is another longtime, big brand name of crochet hooks. Standard Susan Bates hooks are “inline” hooks, meaning that the head of the hook is in line with the rest of the hook.

My most-used Tunisian crochet hook is a Susan Bates size J hook. See photos below for a better idea of what the Susan Bates afghan crochet hook looks like.

Susan Bates Afghan Crochet Hook, AKA Tunisian Crochet Hook

Susan Bates Afghan Crochet Hook, AKA Tunisian Crochet Hook

Susan Bates hooks are probably also available at your local big box craft store.

Clover Crochet Hooks

Clover Soft Touch Crochet Hook Set: Affordable Ergonomic Crochet Hooks

Clover Soft Touch Crochet Hook Set: Affordable Ergonomic Crochet Hooks


I have a set of Clover Soft Touch ergonomic crochet hooks that I love using. I highly recommend them. Clover also makes lovely bamboo crochet hooks and knitting needles. I own some of their bamboo knitting needles, and love those as well.

Crochet Lites: Light-Up Crochet Hooks

Crochet Lite Crochet Hooks

Crochet Lite Crochet Hooks


See Your Stitches Better When You're Crocheting With Dark Yarn. Use a Light-Up Crochet Hook Like the Crochet Lite.

See Your Stitches Better When You’re Crocheting With Dark Yarn. Use a Light-Up Crochet Hook Like the Crochet Lite.


The first time I heard about crochet hooks that light up, I thought, “how silly!” I’m here now to eat those words, because I was soooooooo wrong about that. Light-up crochet hooks are not silly at all; they’re one of the best inventions ever. And I’m not just saying that because once, these crochet hooks saved my life. If you’re curious about how that happened, I invite you to read about it (among other things) in my product review of the Crochet Lite crochet hook.

More Crochet Hook Brands:

  • Addi crochet hooks
  • Tulip Etimo crochet hooks
  • Chiagoo crochet hooks
  • Lion Brand crochet hooks
  • Skacel crochet hooks

Crochet Hook Terminology

I often receive reader questions about crochet hook terminology. A frequently asked question: “what’s the difference between a crochet hook and a crochet needle?” Another: “Is there any such thing as a crochet needle?” and another: “Which term is correct — crochet needle or crochet hook?” If you’ve wondered about the answers to any of these questions, click here to find your answers.

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