5 Crochet Blanket Edges Free Instructions and Patterns for Crocheting Blanket Edges

Can you ever have too many crochet edging patterns for blankets and afghans? I think not. The way I see it, it’s essential for crocheters to keep a wide variety of different patterns on hand. This enables us to be well-prepared every time we crochet a new afghan.

Some blankets will look better if they are finished off with plainer edgings, because their vivid patterns or colors steal the show visually. Others start out simpler and less attention-grabbing; those might be better enhanced by fancy, eye-catching borders. So it’s obviously ideal to have a variety of options to choose from. The more edging patterns you have stashed, the better your odds of pairing your latest blanket-in-progress with just the right edging that will make it perfect.

The patterns on this list are noteworthy because they all include instructions for turning the corners. That way, you can work all the way around the outer edges of your blanket — unlike the approach you’d take for finishing a sheet, where you usually only work the edging across the upper edge, or with a pillowcase, where you’d only finish the opening.

A decent stash of edging patterns is essential for those of you who enjoy cranking out remarkable quantities of granny squares. If that’s you, or even if it isn’t, be sure to check out the list and grab the patterns that strike your fancy.

I hope you’ll find these instructions and patterns useful.

1. Easy Lacy Shell Edging

Easy Lacy Shell Edging -- Free Crochet Pattern

This shell edging is a versatile design that you can use with or without a corner. The corner makes it ideal for finishing off blankets and afghans; it’s also easy to use it for trimming other coordinating accessories, like dresser scarves and curtains, even if you want to just use it across one edge on pieces like those.

This is one of those super-simple designs that’s ideal for finishing off fancy, colorful or eye-catching blanket patterns that just need a little extra touch to be completed.

This is also a nice pattern to use when you’re in a huge hurry to get your blanket finished — perhaps if it’s a last-minute gift you’re rushing to complete.


Click here to get the free crochet pattern for this easy lacy shell edging.

2. Scalloped Crochet Edging

Scalloped Crochet Edge -- Free Pattern

I adore this pretty scalloped edging pattern, both for its versatility and its simplicity. I also appreciate the speed at which it works up; for an edging pattern, it’s pretty quick.

I’ve shared several different versions of this pattern, enabling you to adapt it for a variety of different uses. It’s ideal for use on afghans, baby blankets and throws. I’ve also included straight-across versions you can work in either rounds or rows. These would come in handy for trimming projects like cowls, fingerless mitts, dresser scarves, curtains, etc — projects where you need to know what to do if there aren’t any corners to work around.


Click here to get the free pattern for the scalloped crochet edging.

3. Simple Single Crochet Blanket Border

Simple Single Crochet Blanket Border

This is another ultra-simple blanket edging. It’s one of my tried-and-true favorites. I especially love this edging on blankets for guys, and also on “busy,” colorful or eye-catching afghans for anyone.

Pictured here, you can see how this border looks on a patterned Christmas blanket featuring Christmas tree motifs. That’s only one example of how it could be used; you certainly have plenty of other options as well.


Click here to get the free pattern for the simple single crochet blanket border.

4. Easy Treble Crochet Shell Stitch Edging in Two Colors

Treble Crochet Shell Stitch Edging in Two Colors
Treble Crochet Shell Stitch Edging in Two Colors

Here’s a new twist on the classic crochet shell stitch edging pattern. This edging design offers you a lovely scalloped finish for your blankets, the same as you’d expect from a traditional shell stitch edging.


What’s different about this intriguing design: The colors on this edging appear to alternate, so the effect is more colorful than an ordinary solid-shell crochet edging would be.


Despite that, this pattern is easier than you’d think. You only actually work with one color per round, so you don’t have to do massive numbers of complex color changes; you just do ultra-simple color changes between rounds.


Click here to get the free shell stitch edging pattern.

5. Puff Lace Crochet Edging Pattern

Puff Lace Crochet Edging Pattern

This pattern is slightly more challenging than the others pictured above, but it’s still an easy pattern overall. It’s also a little more time consuming than some of the others, because puff stitches take time to complete. Usually, I think they are worth the effort — but if you’re in a hurry this maybe isn’t the best pattern to reach for.

Related Resources:

About the Author: Amy Solovay is a freelance writer with a background in textile design. She has been crocheting and crafting since childhood, and knitting since she was a teenager. Her work also appears at AmySolovay.com, ArtsWithCrafts.com and Crochet-Books.com. Amy sends out a free knitting and crochet newsletter so interested crafters can easily keep up with her new patterns and tutorials. If you’re already an Instagram user, Amy also invites you to follow her on Instagram.

This page was last updated on 6-22-2019.

2 thoughts on “5 Crochet Blanket Edges Free Instructions and Patterns for Crocheting Blanket Edges

  • April 9, 2015 at 8:18 am
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    I love your patterns. I am learning how to crochet and your instructions are easy to read.

    Reply
  • January 6, 2018 at 7:11 pm
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    Hi Amy, I am crocheting the baby blanket with the 4 colours in interrupted v stitch and are now up to the edging that you have done on that pattern. Question is how do you do the line around the main pattern & the edge? I can’t find that anywhere. It is probably an easy thing to do but I need some guidance. Can you get back to me on that please?

    Reply

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