Free Online Sock Knitting Class With Vickie Howell on November 9, 2017 Learn How to Knit Socks

Sock Knitting Class With Vickie Howell: Knit Maker 201: Knit Socks
Sock Knitting Class With Vickie Howell: Knit Maker 201: Knit Socks

Would you like to learn how to knit socks? If so, perhaps you’ll be excited to learn about a free broadcast of Vickie Howell’s class called Knit Maker 201: Knit Socks at Creativelive. The free broadcast of this sock knitting class will take place on November 9-10, 2017. My understanding of the situation is that, if you want access to the free broadcast, you’ll have to RSVP for the class before it starts to air on November 9th. Tip: After you click through to the course description page, look up at the top right-hand side of your monitor for the black button that says “RSVP”. (There’s also a blue button that says “Buy” if you prefer to just buy the class and watch it immediately.)


I RSVP’ed for the class and am looking forward to it. 🙂 I hope you’ll have a chance to check it out, too.


This isn’t usually a free class; the regular class price is $29. So getting in on the free broadcast is actually a really good deal. If for some reason you miss the free broadcast, or any part of it, you’ll be able to access the class at its regular price any time afterwards.

Creativelive offers bunches of excellent classes on a variety of topics — knitting, crochet, sewing, photography, business and more. You can click here to see what other classes are airing soon at CreativeLive.

Learn More About Sock Knitting:

Supplies You’ll Need for Sock Knitting

To knit socks, you’ll need sock yarn and appropriate knitting needles. Most people knit socks using sets of double-pointed sock knitting needles. I’m pretty sure it’s also possible to knit socks using a circular knitting needle that has an ultra-short cord length — if you can find a needle that’s the right size.

Where to Find Spectacular Sock Knitting Patterns

Denise Samson included 4 excellent sock patterns in her book called The Cable Knitter’s Guide published by Trafalgar Square Books. The sock patterns are as follows:

  • Cozy Slippers — These are gorgeous cabled slipper socks that look like they’d be worth the effort — they are that pretty. If you knit gifts for loved ones, the slippers would be an extra-special gift.
  • Socks With Reversible Cables — These slouchy socks have cabled cuffs that you can pull up or fold down. The cables look the same on either side, so there’s no need to worry about hiding a “wrong” side.
  • Knit Socks With Reversible Cables from the Book The Cable Knitter's Guide by Denise Samson, Published by Trafalgar Square Books
    Knit Socks With Reversible Cables from the Book The Cable Knitter’s Guide by Denise Samson, Published by Trafalgar Square Books
  • Maj’s Ankle Socks — These elegant lace ankle socks feature a lovely cabled design.
  • Lace and Cable Knit Ankle Socks from the Book The Cable Knitter’s Guide by Denise Samson, Published by Trafalgar Square Books
  • Tormrod’s Stockings — These intricate cabled knee socks are guy-friendly; the author designed them for her significant other to wear on his camping trips and ski trips.

The socks aren’t the only fantastic patterns in the book; this book is actually sort of like a cable stitch dictionary that also offers you finished patterns for trying out the cables. There are also excellent patterns for blankets, sweaters and bunches more accessories.

My Sock Knitting Saga

I’ve always wanted to learn how to knit socks. When I was a teenager, I invested the money in buying a lovely set of bamboo double-pointed needles; but I couldn’t figure out how to use them despite having looked at several books and magazine articles on the topic of sock knitting. I made an honest effort to learn how to knit socks, but without someone to show me the finer points, it wasn’t long before I lost interest. There were too many other amazing projects to work on. I decided to invest my efforts in knitting sweaters and hats, and I never actually returned to sock knitting.


Until now…


When I was traveling in Europe a few years ago, I bought a circular knitting needle that I think (hope) will work for knitting socks. I’m thinking it will be preferable to dealing with bunches of individual double-pointed needles. Having never successfully knit socks with any type of knitting needles, the jury is out on whether I will be able to do this. We’ll see!

I’ll be pulling my circular and double-pointed knitting needles out of the closet and tuning in to Vickie Howell’s sock knitting class on November 9th to see if I can finally learn how to knit socks. Here’s hoping I’ll have more success this time around than I have in the past — and here’s hoping you’ll join me and learn how to knit socks, too!

Learn How to Crochet Corner to Corner With Sarah Zimmerman’s C2C Crochet Class Crochet a Cute Animal-Themed Baby Blanket While You Learn This Fun Technique

You could crochet an adorable baby blanket just like this one using the corner to corner crochet technique. Sarah Zimmerman shows you how to do it in her fun corner-to-corner crochet class from Annie's.
You could crochet an adorable baby blanket just like this one using the corner to corner crochet technique. Sarah Zimmerman shows you how to do it in her fun corner-to-corner crochet class from Annie’s.

Why Learn How to Crochet Corner to Corner?

There are bunches of compelling reasons you might want to learn how to crochet corner to corner. For starters, corner-to-corner crochet is one of the hottest craft trends right now. Perhaps you’ve already seen some of the amazing projects people are designing using this technique. Blankets, throws and afghans are some of the most popular corner-to-corner crochet projects, but you can make a wide variety of different projects using this technique. I’ve seen beautiful scarves, pillows, dishcloths and table runners made in corner-to-corner crochet.

What I find most appealing about this technique: It offers you an interesting new way to create colorful pictorial patterns in crochet. In this regard, it has some similarities to the other techniques you can use for crocheting graphic designs:

  • Filet crochet
  • Tapestry crochet
  • Cross stitch on crochet

BUT this technique is pretty different from all of those, and it offers some advantages over each of those techniques. For example, I LOVE tapestry crochet, but the fabric can get thick and cumbersome when you’re working with more than 3 colors in the same piece. This is not a worry with corner-to-corner crochet.


I LOVE pictorial filet crochet patterns, but most filet crochet patterns are only one color. It’s also easier to see the picture when you crochet with fine threads and small steel hooks — which can get fiddly. With corner-to-corner crochet you have the option to make your designs either colorful or monochromatic, and the yarns can be as thick or thin as you like without having it adversely affect the visibility of the picture you are crocheting. If you enjoy fiddly projects with fine threads and steel hooks, you can certainly use those materials to create spectacular corner-to-corner crochet projects.


Cross stitch on crochet gives you unlimited options for colors and color placement, but its disadvantage is that it is a really slooooooooow technique. I find corner-to-corner crochet to be much faster.


Pictorial patterns aren’t your only possible design options with corner-to-corner crochet. Even solid-colored projects are interesting to work in this technique. If you want to crochet a diagonal stripe, it’s much more intuitive to do so using corner-to-corner crochet than it is to use tapestry crochet.


So whether you prefer solid-colored projects or colorful ones, either way, this is a technique that is well worth learning. I was really excited to learn about it and am excited to incorporate the technique into my repertoire of crochet skills.


If this sounds like a technique you would like to learn how to do, Sarah Zimmerman is a crochet designer who should definitely be on your radar. Sarah has mastered the corner-to-corner crochet technique — and she can help you learn how to master it, too.

Sarah Zimmerman is the Instructor for a Fantastic Corner to Corner Crochet Video Class From Annie’s.

Learn How to Crochet Corner-to-Corner With This Video Class Taught by Sarah Zimmerman.
Learn How to Crochet Corner-to-Corner With This Video Class From Sarah Zimmerman and Annie’s.

Sarah has teamed up with Annie’s Crafts to create a high-quality video class intended to teach you the basics of corner-to-corner crochet. The practice project for the class is an adorable baby blanket featuring cute animal motifs: a lion, a panda bear, an elephant and a monkey. The animal squares are alternated with solid-colored blocks. This is an ideal design for beginners to the technique. That’s because all those solid blocks give you the perfect opportunity to master the single-color version of the corner-to-corner crochet stitch before you move onto learning how to do the more complex blocks that require color changes.

This practical project also gives you a chance to make something really useful while you perfect your corner-to-corner crochet skills.

You can attend Sarah’s class without ever leaving your house, so it’s about as convenient as you can get. In times past, you had to go out of your way to attend a class of this quality; if you were lucky enough to have an innovative local yarn store in your area, or lucky enough to attend a convention, you’d have been able to. Luckily, now there’s no need to invest in expensive airfare, hotel rooms and convention admission if those things are not in your current budget; Annie’s Crafts has made it easy and affordable to access amazing craft classes from home. While I do recommend attending classes, conventions and workshops in person if you have the opportunity to do so, those are no longer your only options for taking truly outstanding crochet classes.

There are two different ways you can access this corner-to-corner crochet class: on DVD, or through Annie’s online portal. Either way, you’ll have the opportunity to ask the instructor, Sarah, questions. The video is really clear and helpful, so you’ll probably find that you won’t need to take advantage of this option — but it’s nice to know you do have the option if you need it. If there’s something that just doesn’t seem clear to you when you watch the video, or if you get stuck when you’re working any part of the baby blanket, the class materials include instructions for how to contact Sarah and ask for her help.

Crochet Skill Level Required for This Class: “Confident Beginner”

The team at Annie’s has given this DVD a skill level rating of “confident beginner”. What that means: Your chances for success with this class are best if you have already learned your basic crochet stitches. For this particular project, you’ll want to have a working knowledge of the chain, slip stitch, single crochet and double crochet stitches. This class does not make any attempt to teach you how to crochet starting at the beginning; in this class, Sarah focuses specifically on teaching the corner-to-corner crochet technique. She does, however, teach you several of the other mechanical skills you’ll need to construct and finish a blanket (like how to join your squares together, how to weave in your loose ends, etc).


One thing you have to beware of when you learn new crochet skills online: There are some crochet bloggers out there who are not really all that experienced with crochet. (No, I’m not going to name any names here). I’ve been crocheting for more than 35 years, and when I spend time looking at other crafters’ tutorials and videos, it is painfully obvious to me that there are some bloggers out there who have not put in the time it takes to master the techniques they are attempting to teach you.


This is not a worry with Sarah Zimmerman’s corner-to-corner crochet class. It is obvious to me that Sarah Zimmerman has invested the time it takes to become an expert at the technique she is teaching you. This is one reason you’ll want to consider learning this technique from her class.


I think you’ll find this class especially beneficial if you are not already an experienced crocheter. If you’re a beginner at crochet, I think you will find it helpful to watch Sarah’s way of working — the way she holds her yarn and her hook, and the way she manipulates them to work her crochet stitches, and the speed at which she is able to work because of the way she expertly uses her hands in harmony with each other. If you’re attempting to learn how to crochet by using books, and you’re struggling but not ready to give up yet, my opinion is that this class could really be helpful to you. It gives you a fantastic opportunity to watch an experienced crocheter with the aid of exceptionally helpful camera angles.

In some ways, I think this class is going to be more helpful than even taking an in-person crochet class would be. There are a couple of reasons for this:

  • There are cultural “personal space” barriers to worry about with a real live instructor. Unless it’s your mom, sister or grandma teaching you how to crochet, you can only comfortably get so close to your instructor. This video has removed those cultural “personal space barriers” and gets your attention focused right on Sarah’s hands in such a way that you don’t even think twice about it; it isn’t an uncomfortable experience at all. Whereas it could be an uncomfortable experience trying to get this close to a crochet instructor in a live class setting, particularly one where there are many students participating and you have to sort of fight for space to see what the instructor is doing.
  • You don’t have to worry about anyone thinking you are an idiot if you don’t get everything the first time the teacher explains it. Whereas in a live class setting, you might feel uncomfortable asking the instructor to demonstrate another 13 or 56 times, with this class, you can watch any part you need to as many times as you want. Just play it again. And again. And again. As many times as it takes for you to get it right.

Crochet Skills, Techniques, Tips and Tidbits You’ll Learn in This Class

The primary focus of this class, of course, is learning how to do the corner-to-corner crochet technique. There are additional crochet skills and techniques you’ll learn from this video:

  • How to weave in your loose ends of yarn securely so they will not come undone. This is important!
  • How to join your blanket squares almost invisibly using the mattress stitch. I personally found it difficult to learn this stitch from written tutorials, and I didn’t really get it until I saw it demonstrated on video. This stitch is really useful to know; if you haven’t already mastered it, I think you will be glad to see Sarah demonstrate it for you. She is an expert at this stitch; her expertise shines through in both her clear and simple explanation and the tidy, even stitches she makes in her demonstration. This stitch is really helpful for any crafter to understand, as you can use it for seaming just about any type of crochet or knitting project that requires one side or piece to be stitched to another. In this class, you’ll be using mattress stitch for joining your crocheted squares to create the finished baby blanket. Long after you’re finished with the class, you’ll be able to continue using it in other ways — perhaps for things like seaming one side of a cowl to the other, sewing up the sides of fingerless gloves or attaching trims to your projects.
  • How to prep your yarn and keep everything organized. It is obvious that Sarah has put a TON of thought into this, so the insights she shares on this topic are valuable.
  • How to read a corner-to-corner crochet graph — including a genius tip for how to avoid having to keep re-counting over and over again. If you’ve struggled with understanding C2C graphs before, I think Sarah’s simple and straightforward explanation will clear up the mysteries for you (but if it doesn’t, she is happy to answer your questions if you message her through the online class portal).
  • How to change colors in corner-to-corner crochet. Sarah demonstrates this for you multiple times throughout the class because it is a technique you’ll use frequently. This is an important skill to master, and you’ll have the benefit of seeing how she does it in several different places throughout the pattern.
  • How to carry a yarn color up to your working position. This is another exceptionally helpful skill for use on some multicolored corner-to-corner crochet projects. If you don’t already know how to do this, you’ll definitely want to learn this secret; there are many instances in which it will enable you to avoid having to cut your yarn and re-attach it, saving valuable yarn as well as working time and end-weaving time.
  • When it comes time to finish your project, you might be disappointed if there are areas in your colorwork that look a little messy. Sarah shares a secret for easily fixing the messy-looking areas — without you having to unravel or re-work anything. I think you’re going to love this! (For those of you who’ve worked some of my multicolored crochet patterns in the past, I’ll give you a hint: It IS NOT my usual, totally time consuming method of using surface crochet slip stitches around the messy areas.)

The Best Things About This Class

The video class makes this technique marvelously clear, whereas written tutorials do not generally manage to accomplish the same level of clarity. Before I watched this video, I looked at bunches of different corner-to-corner crochet tutorials — and had a hard time figuring out what exactly I was supposed to be doing. As it turns out, this is technique is easy and logical when you see a human being demonstrating it. However, there are some complexities that are hard to communicate using only written text and pictures.


The videography is exceptional. I had to watch parts of the class again because instead of paying attention to the subject matter, I was busy wondering about how they managed to get the shots so perfectly aimed above Sarah’s hands that it seems you’re looking right down at them. Amazing!

Many crochet videos are shot at awkward angles that don’t allow you to see the instructors hands as clearly as you might like to. That is absolutely not an issue here. You’ll be able to see Sarah’s hands just about as clearly as you can see your own hands when you crochet.


The crochet baby blanket presented in this video is attractive, appealing and worth the time investment, yet easy enough for people who have never crocheted corner-to-corner before.

Sarah is a wonderfully engaging teacher. Her presentation in the video was well-rehearsed enough to be nearly flawless, yet spontaneous enough to be interesting to watch.


Sarah uses clear, precise language throughout the entire one-hour and 21 minute class video presentation. I didn’t catch any factual errors or unclear instructions in my initial screening of this video. There is one bit of errata that the video team at Annie’s clearly corrected right in the online portal — there’s no need to go looking for it online.


I’ve watched hundreds of crochet videos on the Internet; fact checking independently produced craft videos for a media company was also part of a former job description of mine. Thanks to those experiences, I became aware that many of the crochet videos in existence contain unclear instructions, horrendous factual errors, logic errors, math errors, incorrect terminology, mediocre projects, inefficient methods and/or unworkable camera angles. My conclusion has been that a lot of unsuspecting people are wasting a lot of valuable time with crochet videos that are not worth watching. YIKES!


I bring all this up to help you understand how significant it is that this video does not have any such problems.


My opinion: Your time is the most valuable thing you have. If you want to learn new crochet techniques, you’re wise to seek out videos as a fast-track method for achieving the skills you want. It’s one of the quickest, smartest and most efficient methods available to you — but that’s only assuming you start with top-quality videos to watch. When you’re serious about improving your skills, you unfortunately have to be really picky about the videos you learn from. It is all too easy to waste time on second-rate videos that don’t teach you what you really need to know — or worse yet, teach you things that are downright incorrect. While there are some high quality free crochet videos available online, my experience has been that you are likely waste a lot of time looking for the good ones. That’s time you could be spending on actually learning and improving your crochet skills.


This is a top quality video featuring a professionally designed project and expert instructions — exactly the type of resource you want to invest your time in.

About Sarah Zimmerman, the Class Instructor

Sarah is not only a talented crochet designer; she actually has been formally trained in the art of graphic design.

Conclusion

I highly recommend Sarah Zimmerman’s “Learn Corner-To-Corner Crochet” class from Annie’s Crafts. If you have a desire to learn how to crochet corner-to-corner plus money to spend on improving your crochet skills, this video is a wise use of resources.

Annie’s offers quite a few interesting video classes. I chose this class as the one I wanted to review because corner-to-corner crochet was a technique I found perplexing at first. I’m pretty adept at deciphering cryptic crochet instructions — so I figure that, if I had a hard time understanding this, bunches of you probably would, too. My experience was that it took a HUGE investment of brainpower and deductive reasoning to figure out the corner-to-corner crochet technique just from studying the free photo tutorials that are available online. But once you watch this video, I’m positive that you’ll be empowered with the ability to better understand all the amazing free corner-to-corner tutorials, patterns and resources that crochet designers have been posting — at least, that was the case for me.

Other Crafters’ Testimonials for Sarah Zimmerman’s Corner-to-Corner Crochet Class

I’m not the only crocheter who recommends this class. Here’s what a few other reviewers have posted about it:

“Extremely helpful, instructions are demonstrated beautifully! Would love more classes on a different pattern by Sarah.”

— This quote is from a customer tutorial posted by Kathleen M on August 14, 2017 at the Annie’s website.


“Very well done! Sarah is very easy to follow. I would take another class from her no question.”

— This quote is from a customer tutorial posted by Kathy S on August 11, 2017 at the Annie’s website.


” This is a great class. I love the animal baby blanket, too. Sarah, you do a wonderful job explaining the entire process. I especially liked the color changes.”

— This quote is from a customer tutorial posted by Suzanne M on June 3, 2017 at the Annie’s website.


Click here to see more customer testimonials for this class.

Where to Buy the Learn to Crochet Corner-to-Corner Class

Both formats for this class are available for sale at the Annie’s website:

Crochet, Knitting and Other Creative Classes at My New Favorite Website

I have a new favorite website. I love this site for bunches of reasons:

  • They make a huge variety of interesting video-based creative classes available on topics that interest me — crafts, photography, business and much more.
  • They let you view bunches of different video classes for free with no strings attached. If you enjoy the class enough to want to watch it again, you have the opportunity to pay for access to the class — but they don’t pressure you to do so. I think this business model is win-win for everyone.
  • The videos don’t have annoying ads on them the way Youtube videos often do.
  • Their instructors have a talent for making complex topics interesting and easier to understand.
  • This site has many famous class instructors on board. To give some examples, if you need a beginner’s class for knitting or crochet, you could take a class from Vickie Howell through this website. Anne Geddes has photography classes available through this website.
  • The videos I’ve seen so far have all been high-quality and worth watching.
  • I like hearing from the people at this site. They send interesting emails that I often open and read. Their blog is filled with helpful posts, and I’ve learned quite a bit from reading their posts and watching their classes.
  • They offer frequent sales and discounts on their paid classes. Their class prices vary greatly, but tend to be reasonable to start with — so their sale prices typically represent an outstanding value.

Want to check out this site? Here are some links you might find helpful: