Crochet Bead Necklace Pattern a Free Crochet Pattern for a Shimmering Beaded Necklace

Crochet Bead Necklace Project Photos:


Crochet Bead Necklace Pattern: Gold, Pale Blue, and Peach / Orange Colorway
Crochet Bead Necklace Pattern: Gold, Pale Blue, and Peach / Orange Colorway

Crochet Bead Necklace Pattern: Blue, Red and Orange Colorway
Crochet Bead Necklace Pattern: Blue, Red and Orange Colorway

See More About: Bead Crochet | Jewelry Patterns | DIY Crochet Necklaces | Thread Crochet


If you’re looking for an extraordinary jewelry-making project to get started on, why not give this crochet bead necklace pattern a try? This necklace is remarkable because it is comfortable to wear, beautiful to look at and an interesting project to make.


Part of this design’s appeal comes from the juxtaposition of shimmering surfaces. The piece incorporates glittering metallic embroidery floss, a sparkling fused glass pendant and glossy glass seed beads. Each of these elements is attractive on its own, but the combination of all three is simply dazzling.

Crochet Skill Level: Intermediate


This is an intermediate level crochet pattern.

Supplies Needed for Making This Necklace:

Supplies Needed for Crocheting the Beaded Necklace
Supplies Needed for Crocheting the Beaded Necklace

Crochet Hook — You’ll need a 2.5 mm (size C) crochet hook.


Metallic Embroidery Floss — To achieve the same look as the project sample, you’ll need 1 – 2 skeins (8 m / 8.7 yards) of embroidery floss or a comparable weight metallic yarn. It could also be interesting to experiment with shiny, silky yarns of a different variety. To make the two sample necklaces, I used limited-edition colors of DMC Light Effects embroidery floss that are now hard to find; for the lighter, gold-colored sample, the Precious Metal Effects Light Gold colorway is an excellent substitute. There are many pretty colors available, so feel free to choose any color that complements the beads and other supplies you want to work with.

Pendant: A sparkling, fused glass handmade pendant forms the focal point on each of my two sample necklaces. In the first colorway, the pendant features a stunning array of colors in shades of blue, aqua, turquoise, peach and orange. The other pendant colorway features a vibrant mix of blue and orange hues.

These pendants are handmade, and each one is unique. So, you probably won’t be able to find pendants quite like these samples, but you’ll be able to find something similar. Choose a pendant that appeals to you, and then select beads and other supplies that match it well.

Beads — In my first colorway, I used 81 6/0 blue glass seed beads by Blue Moon Beads. In the second colorway, I used red glass seed beads.

Jewelry Findings — You’ll need a clasp or closure to finish your necklace. I’ve used a lobster claw clasp for mine.

Needles — You’ll need one or more needles for starting and finishing your project. It’s easiest to use a beading needle for stringing your beads and a tapestry needle for weaving in your ends and stitching your jewelry findings to your necklace. Choose a tapestry needle that’s small enough to fit through the attachments on the clasp you’ve selected.

Size of the Finished Necklace

Both of my sample necklaces measure about 14 inches long, which for me is a comfortable choker length.

I was able to make each of my necklaces using only 1 skein of Light Effects metallic floss; not much was left over (only a few inches.) You can easily make your necklace longer than 14 inches, but be aware that you’ll need more than one skein of embroidery floss if you decide to make yours longer.

Special Crochet Stitches Used to Make This Necklace

The Beaded Chain Stitch


How to Crochet the Beaded Chain Stitch
How to Crochet the Beaded Chain Stitch

  • Slide a bead right up next to your work so that it is touching the piece in progress.


  • Tug gently at the active loop on your crochet hook and enlarge the loop until it is just slightly shorter than your bead. You don’t want the bead to go through the loop, but you want the loop to be a comfortable length for completing the stitch.


  • Then work your chain stitch. You’ll work it just as you usually would, except that there’s a bead in there; just reach overtop of the bead, grab your yarn and pull the loop through.

Beaded Slip Stitch

  • Slide a bead close to the work.


  • Work your slip stitch. Again, you’ll work it just as you usually would, except that there’s a bead in it.

Crochet Abbreviations List:

Design Note:

Starting with row 1, you’re going to work into every stitch, whether it has a bead in it or not.

Crochet Bead Necklace Instructions:

String your beads onto your embroidery floss.


String your beads onto embroidery floss. It's easiest to use a beading needle for this purpose. I didn't happen to have one, so I used a small tapestry needle.
String your beads onto embroidery floss. It’s easiest to use a beading needle for this purpose. I didn’t happen to have one, so I used a small tapestry needle.

Foundation Chain: (Ch 3, work 1 beaded ch st). Rep until your piece is the length desired, then work 3 more chs. My sample necklace had 28 beads at this point – 115 sts all together.

R 1: Sl st in 2nd ch from hook, work 4 more sl sts for a total of 5, (work 1 beaded sl st, 3 sl sts.) Rep sequence in parentheses all the way across the r.

R 2: Turn work without working a turning chain, (3 sl sts, 1 beaded sl st) Rep sequence in parentheses all the way across the r.

End off, leaving enough of a tail of yarn to use for attaching the necklace closure.

Attach the pieces of the closure to either side of the necklace. Weave in the ends of any remaining embroidery floss.

Wear the necklace and enjoy it, or give it as a gift.


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This page was last updated on 1/28/2018.

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